A. C. Dirtu Toxicological Center, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Antwerp, Universi



tải về 308.22 Kb.
Chế độ xem pdf
trang1/4
Chuyển đổi dữ liệu25.09.2022
Kích308.22 Kb.
#53297
  1   2   3   4
Covaci 2010 PBDE Analysis Chapter



Sample Preparation and Chromatographic
Methods Applied to Congener-Specific Analysis
of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers
Adrian Covaci, Alin C. Dirtu, Stefan Voorspoels, Laurence Roosens,
and Peter Lepom
Abstract This chapter reviews the recent literature and highlights the technical and
methodological improvements in the analysis of polybrominated diphenyl ethers
(PBDEs). Sample preparation, extraction of the analytes and clean-up are discussed
with emphasis on recent developments. Gas chromatography coupled with mass
spectrometry (GC-MS) is discussed for the instrumental analysis of PBDEs. The
most important parameters that may affect accurate measurements of PBDEs are
also included. Information related to quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC)
procedures used in the analysis of PBDEs, including method validation parameters
and possible sources for biased results, is given in detail. An overview of recent
A. Covaci
ð*Þ
Toxicological Center, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Antwerp, Universi-
teitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Belgium
Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University
of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp, Belgium
e-mail: adrian.covaci@ua.ac.be
A.C. Dirtu
Toxicological Center, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Antwerp, Universi-
teitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Belgium
Department of Chemistry, “Al. I. Cuza” University of Iasi, Carol I Bvd. No 11, 700506 Iasi,
Romania
S. Voorspoels
European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measure-
ments (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, 2440 Geel, Belgium
Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol, Belgium
L. Roosens
Toxicological Center, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Antwerp, Universi-
teitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk, Belgium
P. Lepom
Umweltbundesamt, PO Box 33 00 22 14191 Berlin, Germany
Vietnam Environment Administration Centre for Environmental Monitoring (CEM), 556 Nguyen
Van Cu, Long Bien, Hanoi, Vietnam
E. Eljarrat and D. Barcelo´ (eds.),
Brominated Flame Retardants,
Hdb Env Chem (2011) 16: 55–94, DOI 10.1007/698_2010_81,
# Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010, Published online: 28 July 2010
55


inter-laboratory studies on PBDEs and a discussion of the scores and outcomes
conclude the chapter.
Keywords Analytical methods, Gas chromatography, Mass spectrometry, Mass
spectrometryPBDEs, Polybrominated diphenyl ethers, Quality assurance, Recent
developments, Review
Contents
1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
2
Sample Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
2.1
Sample Pre-Treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
2.2
Extraction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
2.3
Clean-Up and Fractionation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
3
State-of-the-Art of GC-MS Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
3.1
GC Separation of PBDEs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
3.2
Mass Spectrometric Detection for BFRs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
4
Analysis of PBDEs in Polymers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
5
Quality Assurance Parameters: How to Tweak the Quality of Your Analytical Results . . . . 72
6
Recent Inter-Laboratory Studies on BFRs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
7
Future Perspectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
1
Introduction
Due to their widespread environmental occurrence and their possible adverse
effects in organisms, brominated flame retardants (BFRs), such as polybrominated
diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and tetrabromobi-
sphenol-A (TBBP-A), are being determined in a growing number of laboratories.
Analytical methods for BFRs have shown a rapid development and they were in
many cases based on protocols previously established for other persistent organic
pollutants (POPs), such as organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated
biphenyls (PCBs) or polychlorinated dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs). Although
different properties of BFRs (e.g. polarity or vapour pressure) suggest that different
procedures should be applied for their analysis, some common approaches can be
found depending on the analyte, and the type of sample or detection method [
1

4
].
Some compounds, such as individual HBCD isomers and TBBP-A, may require
specific analytical approaches due to their particular properties [
126
]. The methods
described in the literature for the analysis of PBDEs have been reviewed in the past
years [
2

5
]. This chapter focuses on recent literature until 2010 and highlights the
technical and methodological improvements in the analysis of PBDEs. It also gives
detailed information on quality assurance issues including results of recent inter-
laboratory studies
56
A. Covaci et al.


2
Sample Preparation
Although sampling is a crucial step in the complete analytical process, it is not
considered in this chapter since the approach needed for BFRs is not different than
for other POPs. The sample preparation will therefore be covered from sample
collection onwards. Since the use and production of PBDEs have been restricted and
concentrations of some congeners are declining in many regions, scientists were
encouraged to search for more sensitive and selective analytical techniques to
monitor current environmental levels. This has resulted in a growing number of
analytical papers exploring alternate sample preparation methodologies (Table
1
)
for the analysis of PBDEs in abiotic and biotic matrices. In order of execution,
sample preparation usually consists of sample pre-treatment, extraction of the
analytes and clean-up of the crude extract.
2.1 Sample Pre-Treatment
If non-polar solvents are used during sample preparation, the matrix has to be
water-free to enable extraction of the analytes. Biological samples, such as food and
tissue samples, are often subjected to water depletion by mixing the sample with
sodium sulphate or by freeze drying. Subsequent thorough mixing ensures a
homogeneous and water-free matrix. Soil, sediment, sludge and dust samples
should be dried before extraction. In addition, they may be sieved to ensure particle
size homogeneity and to facilitate further manipulations of the samples, but this is
not imperative for a successful extraction or clean-up procedure.
Analysis of hair requires a different sample pre-treatment [
32
]. This matrix
received increasing attention in medical settings where hair analyses are indicative
of pharmaceutical and illicit drug use. The hair has to be washed to eliminate
external contamination, dried and cut. Subsequent destruction of the hair matrix is
necessary to enable the extraction of the analytes. Destruction can consist of an acid
digestion with HCl or a basic digestion with NaOH followed by an overnight
incubation at 40–50

C. Tadeo et al. [
32
] have investigated different sample pre-
treatment techniques to analyse the PBDE content of hair. Acidic digestion provided
cleaner hair extracts with less interfering compounds than those obtained with
alkaline digestion. Moreover, alkaline digestion may degrade some halogenated
compounds (such as some OCPs), although this effect was not observed for PBDEs.
2.2 Extraction
There are some particularities in the sample extraction for PBDE analysis that
requires additional attention. First, the wide range in molecular weights of the
PBDE congeners (between 250 and 960 u) yields different physical behaviours,
indicating that extraction techniques may not work equally well for all PBDE
Sample Preparation and Chromatographic Methods
57


Table
1
Overview
of
typical
analytical
procedures
used
for
the
determination
of
PBDEs
in
selected
matrices
BFRs
(#
cong.)
Sample
type
(g,
mL)
Pre-treatment
Extraction
procedure
a
Clean-up
Instrumental
analysis
Recovery
(%)
RSD
(%)
LOD
References
Water
Di-deca-
BDEs
(8)
Waste
water
(5)
Add
NaCl
ORMOSIL-
SPME
/
GC-ECNI-MS
GC-ECD
/
<
20
0.2–3.6
pg/
mL
[
6
]
Tetra-hexa-
BDEs
(4)
Water
(10)
/
Cloud
point
extraction
(NaCl,
surfactant
and
buffer)
Ultrasound-assisted
back-extraction
(isooctane)
GC-MS
96–106
<
8.5
1–2
pg/mL
[
7
]
Tri-deca-
BDEs
(8)
River
water
Filtration
SPE
-Anhydrous
Na
2
SO
4
-Fractionation
on
Florisil
1
-Acid
silica,
activated
silica,
neutral
alumina
GC-ECNI-MS
57–101
<
16
3–150
pg/L
[
8
]
Tri-deca-
BDEs
(8)
River
water
(particulate
phase)
Filtration
centrifugation
Ultrasound-
assisted
extraction
Anhydrous
Na
2
SO
4
Fractionation
on
Florisil
1
Acid
silica,
activated
silica,
neutral
alumina
GC-ECNI-MS
/
/
4–95
pg/L
[
8
]
Air
and
dust
Tri-deca-
BDEs
(16)
Indoor
air
and
dust
PUF
filtration
Soxhlet
extraction
(24
h,
toluene)
Mixed
silica
(33%
1
M
NaOH
and
44%
H
2
SO
4
)
(170
mL,
heptane)
alumina
(50
mL,
hexane/
DCM,
1:1)
GC-MS
7
0.04–
0.18
pg/
m
3
(air)
0.007–
0.13
ng/
g
(dust)
[
9
]
Tri-deca
BDEs
(11)
Outdoor
air
PUF
filtration
Soxhlet
extracted
(72
h,
Acet:
hexane,
1:1)
Acid/basic
silica
column
(70
mL
DCM:
n
-
hexane,
1:1)
GC-ECNI-MS
/
/
0.15–
15.9
pg/
m
3
[
10
]
Tri-deca
(8)
Indoor
air
and
dust
PUF
filtration
Soxhlet
extraction
(>
16
h,
toluene)
Mixed
silica
(10%
AgNO
3
,
22%
H
2
SO
4
,
44%
H
2
SO
4
,2
%
KOH)
(n
-hexane:
DCM,
80:20)
activated
carbon
silica
(n
-hexane:DCM,
75:25,
toluene)
GC-EI-MS
57
/
/
[
11
]
58
A. Covaci et al.


Mono-deca
BDEs
(56)
Combustion
gas
Filtration
Soxhlet
extraction
(3.5
h,
DCM,
16
h,
toluene)
Mixed
silica
(acid,
basic,
neutral)
basic
alumina
(DCM)
GC-HRMS
10.1–87.9
[
12
]
Tri-deca
BDEs
(12)
Clothes
dryer
lint
(0.2-1)
Soxhlet
(24
h,
toluene)
Silica/acidified
silica/
alumina
GC-HRMS
70
/
/
[
13
]
Sediment
and
sewage
Tri-deca
BDEs
(13)
Sediment
(7)
PLE
(DCM)
Activ.
Cu
Silica–alumina
LC
fractionation
GC-ECNI-MS
/
/
/
[
14
]
Tri-deca
BDEs
(10)
Sediment
Freeze
drying
Grounding
Homogenisation
PLE
(Acet:
n
-
hexane,
1:1)
Activ.
Cu
Silica/alumina
(n
-
hexane/DCM,
6:4)
Alumina/neutr.
silica
/
H
2
SO
4
silica
(n
-hexane)
GC-ECD
GC-ECNI-MS
72–115
/
/
[
15
]
Tri-deca
BDE
(11)
Sediment
/
Soxhlet
(72
h
Acet/
n
-
hexane,
1:1)
+
activated
Cu
Mixed
silica
(acid/basic)
column
(70
mL
DCM:
n
-hexane)
GC-ECNI-MS
73.5–86.7
<
10
/
[
16
]
Tri-deca
BDE
(14)
Sewage
sludge
Freeze
drying
Homogenisation
Cu
powder
MSPD
(alumina
and
Na
2
SO
4
)
assisted
by
sonication
Silica
(AcN)
Filtration
GC-EI-MS
91–104
0.05–5.6
ng/g
[
17
]
Tri-deca
BDEs
(17)
Soil
(10)
Freeze
drying
Homogenisation
Sieving
PLE
(DCM:
n
-
hexane,
1:1)
Silica
gel,
basic
silica,
silica,
acid
silica,
silica
(100
mL
n
-hexane)
GC-HRMS
70–143
/
0.34
ng/g
[
18
]
Tetra-hexa-
BDEs
(6)
Sediment
KMnO
4
H
2
SO
4
Water
SPME
(using
polyacrylate
fibre

headspace
mode)
/
GC-MS/MS
76–111
<
14
<
0.15
ng/g
[
19
]
(continued
)
Sample Preparation and Chromatographic Methods
59


Table
1
(continued)
BFRs
(#
cong.)
Sample
type
(g,
mL)
Pre-treatment
Extraction
procedure
a
Clean-up
Instrumental
analysis
Recovery
(%)
RSD
(%)
LOD
References
Tri-deca
BDEs
(8)
Sediment
(2)
Anhydrous
Na
2
SO
4
UAE
Anhydrous
Na
2
SO
4
Fractionation
on
Florisil
1
Acid
silica,
activated
silica,
neutral
alumina
GC-ECNI-MS
76–100
/
5–145
pg/g
[
8
]
Abiotic
samples
Tri-deca
BDEs
(14)
E-waste
and
autoshredder
waste
Sieving
(2
mm)
MAE
(DCM:
Acet)
-
Silica
and
alumina
GC-ECD
49–150
10
/
[
20
]
Deca
BDE
Polyethylene
+
polystyrene
/
MAE
(toluene:
MeOH)
/
HPLC-UV
85
/
/
[
21
]
Deca
BDE
E-waste
(0.5)
MAE
i-PrOH:
MeOH
(1:1)
and
i-PrOH:hexane
(1:1)
Filtered
(0.45
mm
pore
HPLC
Teflon
filter)
HPLC-UV
30
<
12
[
22
]
Biological
samples
Tri-deca-
BDEs
(13)
Polar
bear
adipose
and
liver
tissue
(0.5)
Homogenisation
Anhydrous
Na
2
SO
4
Column
extraction
(DCM:
hexane,
1:1,
200
mL)
LLE
(H
2
SO
4
)
Deact.
Florisil
1
(1.2%
H
2
O)
GC-MS
79(adip)
77(liver)
30(adip)
37(liver)
0.1
ng/g
ww
[
23
]
Tri-deca-
BDEs
(13)
Polar
bear
brain
tissue
(2)
Homogenisation
Na
2
SO
4
Soxhlet
extracted
(4
h
Acet:
hexane,
1:1,
150
mL)
LLE
(H
2
SO
4
)
Deact.
Florisil
1
(1.2%
H
2
O)
GC-MS
51
64
0.1
ng/g
ww
[
23
]
Tri-deca-
BDEs
(13)
Polar
bear
whole
blood
(2)
Add
1
m
L
6
M
HCl
Add
3
m
L
2
-
propanol
LLE
(MTBE:
hexane,
1:1)
LLE
(H
2
SO
4
)
Deact.
Florisil
1
(1.2%
H
2
O)
GC-MS
74
33
0.1
ng/mL
ww
[
23
]
Tri-deca
BDEs
(13)
Freeze-dried
mussels
(5)
Homogenisation
Freeze
drying
PLE
(DCM)
GPC
silica-alumina
(n
-hexane)
LC
fractionation
GC-ECNI-MS
/
4–31
/
[
14
]
60
A. Covaci et al.


Tri-hepta-
BDEs
(14)
Sea
mammal
blubber
(1)
/3

SLE
(25
mL
DCM,
100

C,
15
min,
microwave)
GPC
(bio-beads,
DCM/
hexane,
1:1)
GC-MS
93–105
8.8–11
/
[
24
]
Tri-deca
BDEs
(8)
Human
serum
and
breast
milk
(5)
Add
HCl
Add
isopropanol
2

LLE
(n
-
hexane/
MTBE,
1:1)
Wash
NaCl/H
2
O
2

LLE
H
2
SO
4
(2
mL)
Silica/H
2
SO
4
column
(2:1,
1
g
,
n
-hexane)
GC-ECNI-MS
/
/
/
[
25
]
Tri-deca
BDEs
(11)
Bird
liver
and
brain
tissue
/
Extracted
twice
with
cyclohexane
and
Acet
(3:2)
LLE
(H
2
SO
4
)
GC-MS
87
6
0.03–0.3
ng/
gw
w
[
26
]
Tri-hepta-
BDEs
(16)
Food
(30)
Blood
(30)
Centrifugation
(blood)
Homogenisation
Na
2
SO
4
SLE
(pentane/
Acet,
1:1)
LLE
H
2
SO
4
(60

C,
1
h
)
Activ.
Alumina
(n
-hexane:DCM)
silica
(hexane)
GC-MS
[
9
]
Tri-hepta-
BDEs
(10)
Fish
muscle
tissue
(3–6)
Freeze
drying
Homogenisation
Hot
Soxhlet
(acet/
hexane,
1:3)
Acidified
silica
(8
g)
Florisil
1
(1
g)
GC-ECNI-MS
70–100
<
10
0.2–0.3
ng/g
lw
[
27
]
Tri-hexa-
BDEs
(6)
Human
milk
(10)
Add
5
m
L
2
%
calcium
oxalate
10
mL
EtOH-
diethylether
(1:1,
v/v)
2

15
mL
hexane
wash
with
H
2
O
dry
over
Na
2
SO
4
GPC
Silica
(n
-hexane:DCM,
88:12,
15
mL)
GC-MS
/
5.5–9.2
0.1–2.5
ng/g
lw
[
28
]
Tri-deca
BDEs
(12)
Placental
tissue
(22)
Homogenisation
Drying
with
diatomaceous
earth
Soxhlet
extraction
(7
h,
500
mL,
n
-hexane:
Acet,
4:1)
Deact.
alumina
(10%
H
2
O)
/activ.
silica/
acid
silica
(40%)
(250
mL
n
-hexane)
GC-ECNI-MS
80–120
/
/
[
29
]
Mono-deca
BDEs
(42)
Tree
leaves
(2)
Rinsing
and
drying
Na
2
SO
4
and
ground
LLE
(30
mL,
n
-hexane:
DCM,
1:1)
Centrifugation
Activ.
silica/basic
silica/
activ
silica/acid
silica
(44%
H
2
SO
4
)/
acid
silica
(22%
H
2
SO
4
)/activ.
silica
(100
mL
n
-hexane)
GC-ECNI-MS
75–115
/
0.001–
0.05
ng/
gd
w
[
30
]
(continued
)
Sample Preparation and Chromatographic Methods
61


Table
1
(continued)
BFRs
(#
cong.)
Sample
type
(g,
mL)
Pre-treatment
Extraction
procedure
a
Clean-up
Instrumental
analysis
Recovery
(%)
RSD
(%)
LOD
References
Tri-hexa-
BDEs
(9)
Muscle
tissue
bluefin
tuna
(3)
-Na
2
SO
4
and
ground
Hot
Soxhlet
extraction
(2
h,
100
mL,
n
-hexane:
Acet,
3:1)
Acid
silica
(8
g)
(20
mL
n
-hexane
and
15
mL
DCM)
GC-EI-MS
96–120
<
10
0.1–0.25
ng/
gl
w
[
31
]
Tri-deca
(14)
Hair
(2)
Wash,
dry,
cut,
mix
3
N
HCl
(24
h,
40

C)
2.5
N
NaOH
(24
h,
40

C)
Extract
4

2m
L
hexane
Florisil
1
/Na
2
SO
4
column
(hexane:
EtOAc,
80:20)
GC-EI-MS
>
90
<
14
0.08–0.9
ng/
g
[
32
]
Mono-
hepta-
BDEs
(40)
Freeze-dried
milk
(1)
Freeze
drying
PLE
Alumina
SPE
(5
g,
40
mL
n
-hexane,
40
mL
n
-
hexane:DCM,
1:2)
GC-ECNI-MS
70–131
<
18
0.01–0.05
ng/g
[
33
]
Mono-deca
BDEs
(43)
Placental
tissue
(4)
Homogenisation
Freeze
drying
MSPD
(Florisil
1
,
n
-hexane:
DCM,
8:2)
GPC
(n
-hexane:DCM,
1:1)
neutral,
basic,
acid,
neutral
silica
(n
-hexane)
GC-ECNI-MS
91–114
[
34
]
Tri-hepta-
BDEs
(9)
Human
serum
(4)
MeOH
vortexing
LLE
(3

2m
L
DEE:
n
-
hexane,
1:1)
Florisil
1
GC-ECNI-MS
75–130
/
/
[
35
]
Tri-hepta-
BDEs
(9)
Human
serum
(1);
sheep
serum
(1)
1
m
L
o
f
5
%
AcN
in
conc.
formic
acid
RP-SPDE
Activated
silicagel
Acid
silica
GC-ECNI-MS
>
50
/
0.5
ng/g
[
35
]
Tri-hepta-
BDEs
(9)
Human
serum
(0.1–1);
sheep
serum
(0.1–1)
0.5
mL
DDW
0.5
mL
formic
acid
1
m
L
o
f
DDW
Stirring
2
h
,
500
rpm
Thermal
desorption
cryotrapping
/
GC-ECNI-MS
39–91
19–25
0
.0
0
7

0.1
7
ng/
g
[
36
]
Acet
acetone,
AcN
acetonitrile,
DCM
dichloromethane,
EtOAc
ethyl
acetate,
EtOH
ethanol,
MTBE
methyl-tert-butyl
ether,
DEE
diethyl
ether,
DDW
distilled
deionised
water,
PUF
polyurethane
foam.
Other
acronyms,
as
identified
in
the
body
text
a
Solvent
mixtures
ratios
are
expressed
on
volume
basis
(v:v)
62
A. Covaci et al.


congeners alike [
37
]. Second, the increasing environmental awareness and the need
for lower detection limits require adaptations of the existing extraction and clean-up
procedures. PBDEs can be successfully extracted by Soxhlet or liquid–liquid extrac-
tion (LLE), but this requires lengthy extraction times and high solvent volumes.
Advanced extraction techniques, such as pressurised liquid extraction (PLE),
ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and
supercritical-fluid extraction (SFE), have recently been introduced to reduce extrac-
tion time and solvent consumption, as well as to improve extraction efficiency.
PLE is widely used for the extraction of PBDEs from solid matrices, such as fish
and sediment. It provides high extraction yields due to the combination of high
temperatures and pressures. The main advantages of this technique are the reduced
extraction time and low solvent consumption, compared to Soxhlet or UAE, and the
possibility to conduct a large number of unsupervised extractions, providing
increased efficiency and better reproducibility. However, solvent type and system-
specific parameters, such as pressure, temperature, heating time, static time, flush
volume, purge time and static cycles, need to be thoroughly optimised for optimal
analyte recoveries. For the analysis of milk samples, an additional advantage of
PLE is its capability to disrupt fat globules and release contaminants from milk
resulting in improved extraction yields [
33
]. PLE has been successfully used to
extract PBDEs from human and environmental samples, such as milk [
33
,
38
],
sediment and fish [
38
]. Although PLE has many advantages over other extraction
techniques, an extensive clean-up of PLE extracts is often required due to the large
amounts of co-extracted compounds (Table
1
).
MAE is based on the application of microwave energy to heat the extraction
solvent, while controlling temperature, pressure and microwave energy. The main
advantage of MAE is a significantly reduced solvent consumption, as low as 20 mL
of solvent per sample [
21
]. Temperature and pressure control allow the heating of
the solvent system under pressure above its boiling point. Due to the combination of
high pressure and high temperature, the solvent remains liquid, promoting analyte
diffusion. The extraction time is shortened compared to Soxhlet extraction. How-
ever, optimisation of influential factors, such as extraction temperature, particle
size, hold-up time and the employed solvent system, is necessary. The addition of
polar compounds, such as methanol, is required for microwave absorption and
therefore for heating of the extraction solvent. Mixtures of polar with non-polar
solvents are commonly used in MAE (e.g. acetone:
n-hexane, isopropanol:cyclo-
hexane, xylene:dichloromethane or methanol:toluene). The extraction of BDE-209
from e-waste resulted in low extraction yields due to its high molecular weight and
its non-polar nature [
22
]. Therefore, the extraction of BDE-209 might require
additional adaptations, such as higher temperature and longer extraction time.
Matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) is increasingly used for extracting
contaminants from a variety of solid and semi-solid matrices. The basic procedure
comprises three major steps: (1) sample grinding in the presence of an excess
amount of sorbent (e.g. alumina), (2) loading of the ground mixture onto an empty
SPE cartridge, and (3) elution with a suitable solvent. Prior to elution, extraction
can be facilitated by placing the cartridges in an ultrasonic water bath [
17
].
Sample Preparation and Chromatographic Methods
63


The efficiency of the MSPD depends on multiple factors, particularly the sorbent
type and the eluting solvent. A careful selection according to the sample matrix and
the substance/substance group to be analysed and the sample matrix is therefore
critical. The advantages of MSPD are its simplicity, efficiency, low cost, and its
speed due to simultaneous extraction and clean-up. MSPD extraction has also been
proven useful in the analysis of placental tissue [
34
], which requires an extraction
technique that is vigorous enough to surface the analytes buried in the tissue. The
optimised MSPD method performed similarly to the Soxhlet extraction [
34
].
Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) is increasingly being used for the determi-
nation of PBDEs in various samples, such as water, sediment, biota tissue and in
manufactured products. In SPME, the analytes are absorbed on a silica fibre coated
with a thin layer of polymers. After insertion of the loaded SPME fibre in the
gas chromatographic (GC) system, the analytes are readily desorbed from
the polymeric fibre, thus eliminating the need for additional sample clean-up.
Headspace SPME has been used to determine PBDEs levels in water, soil, sediment
and sewage sludge [
6
]. However, due to the broad range in molecular weight
and volatility of PBDEs, relatively high extraction temperatures were required.
Room temperature extraction of a broader spectrum of PBDE congeners from
natural waters by SPME can be obtained by using the organically modified silicate
(Ormosil), an SPME phase that possesses specific selectivity for PBDEs [
19
]. From
sediments, a significantly lower extraction yield of PBDEs compared to that
from water has been observed. However, mixing of the sediment with potassium
permanganate, sulphuric acid and water had an important positive effect on the
extraction yield of SPME for tetra to hexa-BDEs [
19
].
The applicability of SPME to PBDEs analysis in wastewater influents has
recently been questioned, since most PBDE congeners are absorbed to the biosolids
during the treatment process, causing a drastic reduction (
>95%) of the PBDE
levels in the effluent [
39
]. Hence, if particle adsorption was predominant in aqueous
media, it might be the best to collect particles and analyse them separately.
Other extraction techniques. A novel technique referred to as cloud point
extraction-ultrasound-assisted back-extraction was recently applied to extract and
pre-concentrate PBDEs from water and soil [
7
]. This technique is based on the
induction of a micellar-organised medium by using a non-ionic surfactant to extract
PBDEs. To couple this efficient extraction technique with GC analysis, ultrasound-
assisted back-extraction (UABE) into an organic solvent was required. The cloud
point of a non-ionic surfactants aqueous solution is defined as the temperature at
which the solution becomes turbid. The cloud point phenomenon occurs in a narrow
temperature range and depends on the nature of the amphiphile and its concentra-
tion. The analytes are extracted in the surfactant-rich (coacervate) phase, which is
small in volume, and decanted into the bottom of a centrifuge tube. To enable
subsequent GC analysis, a simple back-extraction of the coacervate phase with
isooctane is sufficient. Main advantages include low organic solvent consumption,
low cost, simple set-up, environmental friendliness and no need for sample clean-
up. One should mention that the efficiency of the extraction procedure varies with
sample pH, concentration of surfactant, equilibration time and temperature, matrix
64
A. Covaci et al.


modifiers and ionic strength. Therefore, to achieve a high extraction efficiency of
PBDEs from the aqueous bulk, these variables were optimised to establish the
optimal working conditions.
2.3 Clean-Up and Fractionation
Clean-up techniques for PBDEs are often based on multiple silica layer columns
containing varying amounts of neutral, acid and basic silica, with different degrees
of acid or base impregnation. Anhydrous sodium sulphate is often added to ensure a
water-free extract after elution with the most suitable organic solvents. Alumina and
Florisil
1
columns are also used and can be eluted with similar solvents. Importantly,
the use of pre-packed columns minimises the risk of contamination of the adsorbent
by particles from laboratory air, which might contain PBDEs. Both the minimised
exposure of the sample to dust and the use of relatively small volumes of solvents in
the automated fractionation process should be considered particularly valuable in
PBDE analysis since procedural blanks are often a problem (see below). Efficient
removal of large amounts of lipid may be necessary when analysing biota or food.
This is possible using LLE of the raw extracts with concentrated sulphuric acid [
26
]
or gel permeation chromatography (GPC). A short summary of the existing clean-up
procedures and their recent applications is illustrated below and in Table
1
.
Food samples often have high lipid contents and extracts therefore require an
extensive clean-up, such as sulphuric acid treatment at 60

C for 1 h [
9
]. Afterwards,
the organic phase can be separated, dried, re-dissolved and fractionated into two
parts using a small glass column filled with activated alumina. The first fraction was
eluted with
n-hexane and contained the non-polar constituents, while the second
fraction was eluted with a mixture of DCM and
n-hexane (50:50, v/v) and contained
the PBDEs. This clean-up procedure combines the advantages of a clean-up with
sulphuric acid and SPE fractionation. Such procedure is ideal to obtain clean
chromatograms, but requires thorough validation to ensure the stability of the
analytes. Extracts from air and dust, with lower lipid content compared to food
and serum, were subjected to a clean-up on a mixed acid (44% H
2
SO
4
, w/w) and
basic silica (33% 1 M NaOH, w/w) column [
9
], followed by subsequent fraction-
ation on alumina. The hexane fraction was discarded and PBDEs were eluted with
50 mL of
n-hexane/DCM (1:1, v/v).
Removal of lipids from marine mussel extracts was tested using a GPC system
filled with Bio-Beads S-X3 and elution with DCM [
14
]. Subsequent fractionation
was done on silica and alumina, extracts were then treated with concentrated
sulphuric acid and further fractionated using a two-dimensional LC system with
two columns coupled in series. GPC has also been used to clean-up soil samples to
remove humic substances and sulphur [
18
]. Subsequently, the collected fractions
were eluted with
n-hexane through a multilayer silica column. A similar technique
was applied to clean-up soil samples, with acetonitrile as the eluting solvent [
17
].
Afterwards, the extract was filtered before injection.
Sample Preparation and Chromatographic Methods
65


Lacorte et al. [
38
] developed a comprehensive, highly sensitive and robust ultra-
trace analytical method for the quantification of OH-PBDEs, MeO-PBDEs and their
parent PBDE congeners in relevant environmental matrices (sediment, fish and
milk), by means of PLE, followed by GPC and Florisil
1
clean-up. In contrast to
previous studies [
40
,
41
] where PBDEs, OH- and MeO-PBDEs were collected in
separate fractions, all target compounds were eluted in a single fraction, which was
further analysed by GC-HRMS [
38
].
Another approach modified a clean-up and fractionation technique for PCDD/F
purification from environmental matrices (Table
1
) [
12
]. Adaptations include
changes in the solvent composition and volume and the elimination of the carbon
fractionation step for brominated compounds, which significantly increased the
recovery of PBDEs. In another study, a carbon-dispersed column was used in the
analytical procedure for brominated compounds in air and dust samples [
11
]. After
clean-up on a mixed silica gel column and elution of the PBDE fraction with
hexane:DCM, the eluate was additionally purified on a carbon-dispersed silica
column and analytes were further eluted with hexane:DCM and toluene. Using
this technique, recoveries for PBDEs and PCBs were 57 and 54%, respectively,
while recoveries of HBCDs and PBDD/DFs ranged between 74 and 126%.
Simultaneous analysis of PBDEs and their HO- and MeO-metabolites in the
same sample requires extensive clean-up and fractionation procedures, owing to
the different nature of the metabolites. Lipids from polar bear tissue extracts were
removed with concentrated H
2
SO
4
and protonated MeSO
2
-PCBs (remaining in
the acid phase) were separated from all other contaminants, which migrated to
the organic phase [
23
]. Neutral contaminants (PCBs, PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs)
were separated from halogenated phenolic contaminants (HPCs) by aqueous KOH

tải về 308.22 Kb.

Chia sẻ với bạn bè của bạn:
  1   2   3   4




Cơ sở dữ liệu được bảo vệ bởi bản quyền ©es.originaldll.com 2024
được sử dụng cho việc quản lý

    Quê hương