Signals and Communication Technology For further volumes



tải về 7.55 Mb.
Chế độ xem pdf
trang1/29
Chuyển đổi dữ liệu12.10.2022
Kích7.55 Mb.
#53539
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   29
ofdm




Signals and Communication Technology
For further volumes:
http://www.springer.com/series/4748


Hermann Rohling
Editor
OFDM
Concepts for Future Communication
Systems
123


Editor
Hermann Rohling
Institut für Nachrichtentechnik
Technische Universität Hamburg-Harburg
Eißendorfer Str. 40
21073 Hamburg
Germany
e-mail: rohling@tu-harburg.de
ISSN 1860-4862
ISBN 978-3-642-17495-7
e-ISBN 978-3-642-17496-4
DOI 10.1007/978-3-642-17496-4
Springer Heidelberg Dordrecht London New York
Ó
Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011
This work is subject to copyright. All rights are reserved, whether the whole or part of the
material is concerned, specifically the rights of translation, reprinting, reuse of illustrations,
recitation, broadcasting, reproduction on microfilm or in any other way, and storage in data
banks. Duplication of this publication or parts thereof is permitted only under the provisions of
the German Copyright Law of September 9, 1965, in its current version, and permission for use
must always be obtained from Springer. Violations are liable to prosecution under the German
Copyright Law.
The use of general descriptive names, registered names, trademarks, etc. in this publication does
not imply, even in the absence of a specific statement, that such names are exempt from the
relevant protective laws and regulations and therefore free for general use.
Cover design
: eStudio Calamar, Belin/Figueres
Printed on acid-free paper
Springer is part of Springer Science+Business Media (www.springer.com)



v
The contents of this book is based on the work of the Priority Pro-
gram TakeOFDM (SPP1163), funded by the German Research Foun-
dation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG).



vii
Preface
Dear readers, dear friends,
The Orthogonal Frequency-Division Multiplexing (OFDM) digital transmission
technique has several advantages in broadcast and mobile communications appli-
cations. Therefore, the German Research Foundation (DFG) funded a so-called
priority program “Techniques, Algorithms, and Concepts for Future OFDM Sys-
tems” (TakeOFDM), which started in 2004. The main objective of this research
program is to study the specific research topics in a collaborative work between
experts and young scientists from different universities.
In broadcast applications like Digital Audio Broadcast (DAB), Digital Video
broadcast (DVB-T), Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM), and single-cell WLAN sys-
tems,
eral years. However, in wireless and wireline communications there is still need for
further research and optimization. The OFDM transmission technique has gained a
lot of attention in research, and it has proven to be a suitable choice in the design of
digital transmission concepts for mobile applications, such as the Long Term Evolu-
tion (LTE) standard, which is the system proposal for the fourth generation (4G) of
mobile communication systems. The OFDM transmission method, specific medium
access techniques, cellular networks with full coverage, and multiple antenna systems
have been playing an important and ever-growing role in the 4G development.
Since 2004, more than 15 different universities in over 40 specific research projects
have been contributing to the TakeOFDM program, covering a large variety of de-
tailed aspects of OFDM and all related system design aspects. This TakeOFDM
research project led to several PhD theses and is a basis for the young generation of
excellent scientific researchers and staff. The results have been exchanged in several
workshops, conferences, and direct cooperations. Besides topics regarding the phys-
ical layer, such as coding, modulation, and non-linearities, a special emphasis was
put on system aspects and concepts, in particular focusing on cellular networks and
multiple antenna techniques. The challenges of link adaptation, adaptive resource
allocation, and interference mitigation in such systems were addressed extensively.
Moreover, the domain of cross-layer design, i.e., the combination of physical layer
aspects and issues of higher layers, was considered in detail.
This book summarizes the main results and gives an overview of the combined re-
search efforts which have been undertaken in the past 6 years within the TakeOFDM
gratitude to the German Research Foundation (DFG) for their generous funding,
continuous support and fruitful collaboration throughout the lifetime of the Take-
OFDM project. Moreover, my sincere thanks go to all scientists for their excellent
work on a high scientific level and their valuable contributions over the last years.
the OFDM transmission technique is already mature and operational for sev-
I would like to express my
priority program.
he program,
As a coordinator of t


viii 
Preface
The aim of this book is to give a good insight into these efforts, and provide the
reader with a comprehensive overview of the scientific progress which was achieved
in the framework of TakeOFDM. I am convinced that also in the future, these results
will facilitate and stimulate further innovation and developments in the design of
modern communication systems, based on the powerful OFDM transmission tech-
nique.
Prof. Dr. Hermann Rohling
Hamburg, June 2010


ix
Contents
1
Introduction
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
1
1.1
Radio Channel Behavior
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
2
1.2
Basics of the OFDM Transmission Technique
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
5
1.3
OFDM Combined with Multiple Access Schemes
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
10
2
Channel Modeling
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
15
2.1
Joint Space-Time-Frequency Representation
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
16
2.1.1
Multidimensional Channel Sounding
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
17
2.1.2
Extraction of Parameters for Dominant MPCs
.
.
.
.
17
2.2
Deterministic Modeling
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
18
2.2.1
Relevant GTD/UTD Aspects
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
18
2.2.2
Vechicle2X Channel Modeling
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
19
2.3
Stochastic Driving of Multi-Path Model
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
20
2.3.1
Usage of the Large-Scale Parameters for Channel
Characterization
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
21
2.3.2
Relaying
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
24
2.3.3
Cooperative Downlink
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
24
3
Link-Level Aspects
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
33
3.1
OFDM Data Detection and Channel Estimation
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
33
3.1.1
Introduction
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
33
3.1.2
Data Detection in the Presence
of Nonlinear Distortions
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
33
3.1.3
Joint Data Detection and Channel Estimation
.
.
.
.
39
3.2
Spreading
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
47
3.2.1
Introduction
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
47
3.2.2
MC-CDM and MC-CAFS
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
48
3.2.3
Simulation Results
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
49
3.2.4
Concluding Remarks
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
51



Contents
3.3
Iterative Diversity Reception for Coded OFDM
Transmission Over Fading Channels
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
54
3.3.1
Introduction
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
54
3.3.2
Turbo Diversity
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
55
3.3.3
Optimization for Turbo Diversity
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
56
3.3.4
Performance Evaluation
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
57
3.3.5
Summary
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
59
3.4
MMSE-based Turbo Equalization Principles for Frequency
Selective Fading Channels
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
61
3.4.1
Introduction
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
61
3.4.2
System Model
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
61
3.4.3
MMSE Turbo Equalization Principles
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
62
3.4.4
Summary
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
66
3.5
Peak-to-Average Power Ratio Reduction in Multi-Antenna
Scenarios
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
69
3.5.1
Introduction and Overview on PAR
Reduction Schemes
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
69
3.5.2
PAR Reduction Schemes for MIMO
Transmission
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
71
3.5.3
Numerical Results
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
74
3.5.4
Summary
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
74
3.6
Single- vs. Multicarrier Transmission in MIMO
and Multiuser Scenarios
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
81
3.6.1
Introduction
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
81
3.6.2
Point-to-Point MIMO Transmission
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
81
3.6.3
Up- and Downlink Scenarios in Multiuser
Transmission
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
82
3.6.4
Aspects of Channel Coding
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
84
3.6.5
Summary
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
85
3.7
Successive Bit Loading Concept
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
90
3.7.1
Introduction
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
90
3.7.2
System Model
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
91
3.7.3
Bit Loading Algorithm
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
92
3.7.4
Results
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
94
3.7.5
Summary
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
96
3.8
Adaptive Transmission Techniques
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
98
3.8.1
Introduction
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
98
3.8.2
Adaptive Modulation and Coding
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
98
3.8.3
Adaptive MIMO Transmission
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
99
3.8.4
Signaling of the Bit Allocation Table
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
102
3.8.5
Automatic Modulation Classification
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
103
3.8.6
Summary
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
105


Contents 
xi
4
System Level Aspects for Single Cell Scenarios
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
109
4.1
Efficient Analysis of OFDM Channels
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
109
4.1.1
Introduction
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
109
4.1.2
The Channel Matrix G
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
109
4.1.3
Common Channel Operator Models
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
111
4.1.4
Computing the Channel Matrix G
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
112
4.2
Generic Description of a MIMO-OFDM-Radio-
Transmission-Link
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
115
4.2.1
Introduction
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
115
4.2.2
System Model
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
115
4.2.3
Performance Analysis
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
116
4.2.4
Generic Model
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
118
4.2.5
Summary and Further Work
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
120
4.3
Resource Allocation Using Broadcast Techniques
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
122
4.3.1
Motivation
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
122
4.3.2
Resource Allocation Algorithms
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
122
4.4
Rate Allocation for the 2-User Multiple Access Channel
with MMSE Turbo Equalization
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
128
4.4.1
Introduction
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
128
4.4.2
Turbo Equalization
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
128
4.4.3
Rate Allocation using EXIT Charts
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
129
4.4.4
Summary
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
131
4.5
Coexistence of Systems
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
133
4.6
System Design for Time-Variant Channels
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
136
4.6.1
Multicarrier Systems for Rapidly Moving
Receivers
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
136
4.6.2
Highly Mobile MIMO-OFDM-Transmission in
Realistic Propagation Scenarios
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
138
4.7
Combination of Adaptive and Non-Adaptive Multi-User
OFDMA Schemes in the Presence of User-Dependent
Imperfect CSI
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
142
4.7.1
Introduction
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
142
4.7.2
Combining Transmission Schemes
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
142
4.7.3
Numerical Results
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
143
4.8
Integration of COFDM Systems with Multiple Antennas
and Design of Adaptive Medium Access Protocols
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
146
4.8.1
Abstract
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
146
4.8.2
MAC Frame for SDMA Operation and Spatial
Grouping
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
146
4.8.3
Hardware Implementation of COFDM Systems
with Multiple Antennas
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
147
4.9
Large System Analysis of Nearly Optimum Low Complex
Beamforming in Multicarrier Multiuser
Multiantenna Systems
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
150


xii 
Contents
4.9.1
Introduction
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
150
4.9.2
System Model
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
150
4.9.3
Description of Algorithms
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
151
4.9.4
Approximation of the Ergodic Sum Rate with
Large System Analysis
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
152
4.9.5
Numerical Results
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
154
4.10
Combined Radar and Communication Systems
Using OFDM
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
156
4.10.1
Introduction
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
156
4.10.2
Signal Design
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
156
4.10.3
The Radar Subsystem
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
158
4.10.4
Measurements
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
160
4.10.5
Summary
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
163
5
System Level Aspects for Multiple Cell Scenarios
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
165
5.1
Link Adaptation
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
165
5.1.1
Motivation
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
165
5.1.2
Example of a Multiple Link Scenario
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
165
5.1.3
Adaptation of Physical Link Parameters
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
169
5.1.4
Cross-Layer Adaptation
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
176
5.1.5
Multiple Link Network - Overall Adaptation
.
.
.
.
.
178
5.2
System Concept for a
Data Transmission Network
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
180
5.2.1
Introduction
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
180
5.2.2
Beamforming Concepts
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
181
5.2.3
System Concept
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
182
5.2.4
Summary
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
190
5.3
Pricing Algorithms for Power Control, Beamformer Design,
and Interference Alignment in Interference
Limited Networks
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
192
5.3.1
Introduction
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
192
5.3.2
System Model
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
192
5.3.3
Distributed Interference Pricing
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
193
5.3.4
MIMO Interference Networks and
Interference Alignment
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
196
5.3.5
Summary
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
198
5.4
Interference Reduction: Cooperative Communication
with Partial CST in Mobile Radio Cellular Networks
.
.
.
.
.
199
5.4.1
Introduction
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
199
5.4.2
System Model and Reference Scenario
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
200
5.4.3
Significant CSI Selection Algorithm and Channel
Matrix Formalism
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
203
5.4.4
Decentralized JD/JT with Significant CSI for
Interference Reduction
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
205
MIMO-OFDM-Based Self-Organizing


Contents 
xiii
5.4.5
Impact of Imperfect CSI on Cooperative
Communication Based on JD/JT
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
208
5.4.6
Advanced Algorithm Based on Statistical
Knowledge of Imperfect CSI
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
210
5.4.7
System Concept Based on Different Levels of
Knowledge of CSI
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
211
5.4.8
Outlook
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
211
6
OFDM/DMT for Wireline Communications
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
215
6.1
Discrete MultiTone (DMT) and Wireline
Channel Properties
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
215
6.1.1
Properties of the Twisted-Pair Channel
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
215
6.1.2
Discrete MultiTone (DMT)
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
219
6.2
Optical OFDM Transmission and Optical
Channel Properties
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
225
6.3
Impulse-Noise Cancellation
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
227
6.3.1
Common Mode and Differential Mode
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
227
6.3.2
Coupling and Transfer Functions
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
227
6.3.3
Common-Mode Reference-Based Canceler
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
227
6.3.4
Impulse Noise Detection and Cancellation
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
229
6.3.5
Simulation Results
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
230
6.4
Dual Polarization Optical OFDM Transmission
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
233
6.4.1
Setup
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
233
6.4.2
Noise Variance Estimation
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
234
6.4.3
ADC/DAC Resolution
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
237
6.5
Forward Error Correction
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
238
6.5.1
BICM-ID System Model
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
239
6.5.2
Influence of the Applied Mapping
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
241
6.5.3
Simulations on the Performance
of Coded OFDM
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
241
6.6
Summary
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
243
Index
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
251



H. Rohling (ed.), OFDMConcepts for Future Communication Systems, 1
Signals and Communication Technology, DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-17496-4_1,
© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011
1 Introduction
H. Rohling, Hamburg University of Technology, Germany
In the evolution of mobile communication systems, approximately a 10 years pe-
riodicity can be observed between consecutive system generations. Research work
for the current 2nd generation of mobile communication systems (GSM) started in
Europe in the early 1980s, and the complete system was ready for market in 1990.
At that time, the first research activities had already been started for the 3rd gener-
ation (3G) of mobile communication systems (UMTS, IMT-2000) and the transition
from second generation (GSM) to the new 3G systems was observed around 2002.
Compared to today’s GSM networks, these UMTS systems provide much higher data
rates, typically in the range of 64 to 384 kbit/s, while the peak data rate for low mo-
bility or indoor applications is 2 Mbit/s. With the extension of High Speed Packet
Access (HSPA), data rates of up to 7.2 Mbit/s are available in the downlink. The
current pace, which can be observed in the mobile communications market, already
shows that the 3G systems will not be the ultimate system solution. Consequently,
general requirements for a fourth generation (4G) system have been considered in
the process of the “Long Term Evolution” (LTE) standardization. These require-
ments have mainly been derived from the types of service a user will require in
future applications. Generally, it is expected that data services instead of pure voice
services will play a predominant role, in particular due to a demand for mobile IP
applications. Variable and especially high data rates (100 Mbps and more) will be
requested, which should also be available at high mobility in general or high vehicle
speeds in particular (see Fig. 1.1). Moreover, asymmetrical data services between
up- and downlink are assumed and should be supported by LTE systems in such a
scenario where the downlink carries most of the traffic and needs the higher data
rate compared to the uplink.
To fulfill all these detailed system requirements, the OFDM transmission tech-
nique applied in a wide-band radio channel has been chosen as an air interface for
the downlink in the framework of LTE standardization due to its flexibility and
adaptivity in the technical system design. From the above considerations, it already
becomes apparent that a radio transmission system for LTE must provide a great
flexibility and adaptivity at different levels, ranging from the highest layer (require-
ments of the application) to the lowest layer (the transmission medium, the physical
layer ,i.e., the radio channel) in the ISO-OSI stack. Today, the OFDM transmission
technique is in a completely matured stage to be applied for wide-band communi-
cation systems integrated into a cellular mobile communications environment.


2 1 
Introduction
Figure 1.1: General requirements for 4G mobile communication systems
Transmitter
Receiver
Figure 1.2: Multipath propagation scenario
1.1 Radio Channel Behavior
The mobile communication system design is in general always dominated by the
radio channel behavior [19] [25]. In a typical radio channel situation, multi-path
propagation occurs (Fig. 1.2) due to the reflections of the transmitted signal at
several objects and obstacles inside the local environment and inside the observation
area. The radio channel is analytically described unambiguously by a linear (quasi)
time-invariant (LTI) system model and by the related channel impulse response
h
(τ) or, alternatively, by the channel transfer function H(f ). An example for these
channel characteristics is shown in Fig. 1.3, where h(τ) and H(f ) of a so-called
Wide-Sense Stationary, Uncorrelated Scattering-channel (WSSUS) are given.
Due to the mobility of the mobile terminals, the multipath propagation situation
will be continuously but slowly changed over time which is described analytically
by a time-variant channel impulse response h(τ, t) or alternatively by a frequency-


1.1 Radio Channel Behavior 
3
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
-30
-20
-10
0
10
|H
(f)|
/
d
B
f / MHz

tải về 7.55 Mb.

Chia sẻ với bạn bè của bạn:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   29




Cơ sở dữ liệu được bảo vệ bởi bản quyền ©es.originaldll.com 2024
được sử dụng cho việc quản lý

    Quê hương